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Training Videos

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RSA NEWS:       -- Tuesday, December 18, 2018 --       School Announcements:       New duelists, events, and organizations are added to the map all of the time! Be sure to check back soon to see who is ready for a fight in your area!      CLICK HERE for more official news and updates.     RSA Student Count: 275!



Learn How to Fight with a Lightsaber!

Do you want to unlock the secrets to winning duels with the combat saber? Click on one of the options below to learn more about each form and access individual lessons and training videos! (Note: You'll only be able to save and view your progress if you are a registered student and are logged-in.)




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Combat Saber Form Training Videos

Chose Your Path...


All Training Videos of the RSA are organized into sets of matching techniques (known as “Forms”). Click on the icon of each Form below to view its list of videos, and then select the particular video you'd like to view. (Faded Icons represent lessons that are still in the Research and Development stage.)
Get started with the first lesson going over the basics
Form 1
Form 2
Form 3
Lessons for Kids
Lightsaber Duel Reviews
Alternate Form 1
Alternate Form 2
Alternate Form 3
Lessons on Meditation



The First Five Steps



Text-Only Introductory Lessons



An Introduction to Combat Saber Training



About the First Five Steps

Welcome to the new and fast growing sport of combat saber dueling. Whether you are a young student, eager to prove yourself in fearless combat, the ambitious master of a dojo or club, or simply a parent wishing to train a child up in a new hybrid style of fencing and martial arts, then these lessons will serve you well.

This is the first of five essential lessons all students of the techniques of this sport are encouraged to learn. They are known as the First Five Steps, and go over the basics of combat saber dueling, giving you key information that will prepare you to learn specific attacks, parries, and ripostes in later lessons. What is the best way to grip the saber, stand to face your opponent, step during attacks, or score points? All those questions are answered once you have chosen a specific form to learn, as they all depend on which fencing style you are using.

After these first five lessons, and after you have chosen a FORM to master, you’ll be trained in individual dueling techniques and practice drills. It is a lot to learn, but feel free to take your time as you progress. Remember your driving force. Remember also that you may capitalize on even the most modest of growth in a match. After all, you’ll be able to spar and duel better than most before you even get to lesson 20!

The coming lessons have been designed with extensive research into real-world and well established techniques. They have each been rigorously tested. Only those shown to be most effective are taught by the RSA. It was the intention of the RSA’s founders to provide its students with practical techniques that will not only allow them to compete well against all other opponents, but to excel, and to become true champions of the sport.

Of course, that is not to say that techniques taught by other academies are without merit. On the contrary. Every student of swordsmanship can learn something of great value from any other student. Likewise, the greatest saber duelists will be those who study from a broad range of teachers. Once you have mastered all of the RSA’s Form 1 techniques, you’ll then be encouraged to move on to a new form or school in the true spirit of swordsmanship.

A Note on Left-Handedness: All lessons have been written with right-handedness in mind. Left-handed students will gain a considerable advantage over other students and opponents by mirroring their footwork and adjusting their grip as needed. The target zones in each technique, however, should be practiced as they are originally presented.


Common Terminology

Before you can dive too deeply into any school of fencing, it is helpful to have at least a cursory understanding of the meaning behind the following terms:

Lesson: A set of instructions a student of fencing can study on their own, or a presentation that a club leader, dojo master, or parent can share with their student(s) one-on-one, or at a group meeting or class.

Mastery: The level at which a lesson has been fully learned and internalized by a student, as determined by the student and/or by their instructor. Mastery of one lesson is typically required before a student may progress to the next. The use of a lesson’s “Mastery Code” may be required to prove one’s full comprehension of a particular concept.

Technique: A particular maneuver, usually belonging to its own lesson, that follows established steps instructing you on how to swing your combat saber, move your feet, etc. in order to accomplish a clear objective, such a striking your opponent or defending yourself.

Form: This term is commonly used in three different ways. Traditionally, it refers to a practice routine in which multiple techniques are rehearsed. In the sport of combat saber dueling, however, this term more often refers to an entire family of techniques that are often learned and mastered together. Lastly, this word is also used in reference to the quality of your performance. “Good form” can mean that you are following all instructions well, while maintaining good posture, footwork, control of your saber, etc.

Drill: Like the traditional fencing definition of “form,” a practice routine done by a sole duelist, or between training partners, facilitating the rehearsal of multiple specific techniques.

Hit: The moment in which the blade of your combat saber makes (intentional or accidental) contact with your opponent’s body.

Strike: The deliberate action in which you successfully hit, or make contact with, your opponent’s body, resulting in you scoring a point, if done in accordance with the rules of combat saber dueling.

Slice: A broad sweeping motion of your saber, typically when the hilt is relatively stationary while the tip of the blade travels the greatest distance. It can be loosely compared to the swinging of a baseball bat.

Cut: A motion in which a blade is dragged along a surface such as an opponent’s arm, similar to how a serrated knife would be used to cut through cooked meat.

Attack: A complex or simple technique a duelist performs, in which the main objective is to land a successful strike on the opponent and score at least one point.

Parry: A technique employed by a duelist to deflect the opponent’s blade, or otherwise prevent them from landing a strike.

Riposte: A technique comprised of a parry, immediately followed by a counter-attack.

Feint: A preparatory action within a technique in which you distract an opponent with your saber’s position or with body language. This is done in order to cause the opponent to move their saber or body in a way that exposes them to a surprise attack.

Outside: Typically, a reference to the right side of an opponent, including his/her own right shoulder, right arm, right leg, and so forth. This term originally comes from Western fencing, where duelists face each other side-on, and corresponds to the side of a right-handed opponent away from their front, or “outside” where their body is facing. For our purposes, it is used to emphasize that it is the right side of an opponent from their perspective (not from your perspective).

Inside: Typically, a reference to the left side of an opponent, including his/her own left shoulder, left arm, left leg, and so forth. This term originally comes from Western fencing, where duelists face each other side-on, and corresponds to the front side of a right-handed opponent, or “inside” where their body is facing. For our purposes, it is used to emphasize that it is the left side of an opponent from their perspective (not from your perspective).

Match: An event in which two duelists contend with their combat sabers, using the techniques they have learned against one another.

Spar: A friendly match in which the main objective of the sparring partners involved is to train and practice.

Duel: An aggressive and competitive match in which each duelist uses the techniques they have learned in an attempt to score more points than their opponent in a shorter amount of time.


Daily Training

These lessons were researched, modified, and written in such a way that an entire dojo of students could be satisfied with mastering just one lesson per day. After a handful of days, you will see a dramatic increase in your ability to win duels. On the other hand, these lessons were also written for simplicity, so that several days are not needed to master a single technique or idea.

However, do not be too hasty. Students who rush through each lesson, only practicing each technique four or five times, almost always forget old lessons along the way. In order to ensure that your old lessons are not getting lost, practice and master each technique with the recommended number of repetitions. Revisit old lessons often in order to keep them sharp in your mind. In this way, you will not waste time, and your mind will be like a quiver of arrows, filled with techniques, immediately ready for use. Always resist the temptation to skip repetitive practices.

In your path to true mastery, it is recommended that you train with the goal to learn about one lesson per day, over the course of about two and a half months. This allows you time to take a day off to spar and duel with others about once a week.

Of course, this training schedule may be modified by your instructor or master. Likewise if you are a self-taught duelist, you can adjust your own training schedule as needed.


What is a Mastery Code?

Students who record, track, and share their progress perform substantially better than their peers. A “Mastery Code” can help you claim this key advantage!

Each official lesson from the RSA is paired with a randomly generated code, displayed near the end of the lesson. If you wish to track your personal progress (which is highly recommended), you may do so with your RSA student account. After you have logged into your account, use a simple online form to enter in the code matching the lesson you have mastered. (Be sure to copy it exactly, with proper capitalization.) This will unlock digital rewards and allow you to achieve higher levels and ranks within the community. In addition, a digital training journal on your account will be updated along with an interactive tracking chart that displays the lessons you have completed and those you have yet to complete.


How to Practice and Master a Technique

In the lessons to come, you will find instructions on how to perform a certain maneuver. These instructions focus on three main elements: Proper Footwork, Precise Swordwork, and Correct Breathing.

It is your ultimate goal to master each technique so that these three elements are synchronized and inseparable in your mind. Internalize each technique so that you perform all of its steps in one fluid motion, and without having to think about them.

Simply performing this maneuver once or twice will not be enough to properly master it. (Remember, a mastery code should only be used if the technique has become a permanent part of your fighting style, a memory that can be drawn upon with ease in the heat of battle.) In order for such memorization to happen, repetition is key. After you have repeated all of the steps of the technique enough times, the movement will become second nature, and you’ll be able to cover all of the steps in one instinctive motion. Only then can you claim the prize of true mastery, utilize the lesson’s mastery code, record your progress, and continue in your training. Be sure to pass through these phases in your personal training, for each and every technique you encounter:

1. Study Phase: Read through the entire lesson so that each step of it makes sense to you in the context of the overall motion. Alternatively, you may be given these steps by your instructor, in person.

2. Interpretation Phase: Carefully perform the technique, slowly checking to be sure your form and execution of each step meets a high standard. Step forward (as the technique requires) and perform the technique against an imagined opponent, then return back to where you started, only to step forward again to repeat the action. This back-and-forth repeated action is typical of Japanese swordsmanship training. In kendo and kenjutsu it is a type of individual practice (or Hitori Geiko) known as Suburi and Joge buri.

3. Correction Phase: Check your form against what is written in the lesson. If possible, review your technique in front of a mirror and/or ask your instructor and fellow students to correct any mistakes you may be making. Be open to their advice, as you certainly do not want to practice a bad habit over and over.

4. Three-Part Repetition Phase: Once you feel that you truly understand each movement of the technique, divide it into three easy-to-remember steps (or a beginning, middle, and end). There should be a visible pause between the three steps. Make every repetition count. You would be wasting your time if you simply go through the motions. Every time you perform a technique, make it your best attempt. Perform all three steps ten or more times, until you feel you understand the technique well enough to move on to a new technique. But you are not finished yet!

5. Two-Part Repetition Phase: At this point (and only you can tell when you have truly reached this point), you may split all of the parts of the technique into two steps (a “setup” and an “execution”). Perform both steps (stepping forward and back) ten times or more as needed. When you are confident that you could teach this technique to others, then you may move on to the next phase.

6. Single-Action Phase: Synchronize all steps, footwork, swordwork, and breathing into one fluid motion. Continue to step forward and back, executing the technique in one action, repeatedly. Perform this exercise at least ten times, until you feel confident enough to perform this technique within the pressures and challenges of an active duel, and before many spectators. At this point, you should feel that the technique has become a permanent part of you. If that is the case, you may record your progress using the lesson’s mastery code, and continue on to the next lesson.

7. Occasional Review Phase: From time to time, return to old lessons and spend only a few minutes physically going through each of these training phases. Even at this point, be open to, and grateful for, criticisms and corrections. The ancient teachings behind these techniques can be learned quickly, but there are masters of kendo today, over 90 years old, who practice them daily. Even the greatest masters of the sword see the utility and wisdom in daily practice. Mastering a technique is only the first real step. As is the case with becoming a better person or with building character, mastering the sword is a never-ending quest.


Proper Exercise and Diet

Combat saber dueling is a rigorous sport. If you are not in good health, consult with a medical professional about what steps you may need to take before training in any physical sport.

As a student of the RSA, it is expected that you are maintaining a healthy lifestyle. It is recommended that you are drinking plenty of water before, during, and after any training, practice, sparring, dueling, or meditation. As fencing is deeply cerebral, be sure to get plenty of sleep (between six and eight hours) and sufficient daily exercise. If you find yourself too anxious or stressed to learn effectively, engaging in daily relaxation meditation may help.

Whatever your exercise routine, be sure to warm up and stretch beforehand as well as cool down and stretch afterwards. Exercise every major muscle group, and balance intense cardio with weightlifting according to your needs. Pay attention to your caloric intake, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, and make sure your diet includes a variety of nutritious foods. It is important to avoid excessive salt, sugar, and fat in your diet.


Spar With Others Often

There is one important and final note that should be considered as you embark upon the epic journey before you. Though it is convenient to learn and practice each technique on your own, it is not sufficient. There are some things that cannot be taught by a teacher. There are some steps that even the most elaborate lessons will miss. Therefore, it is crucial and vital to your education that you invite friends, family members, and/or fellow students of combat saber dueling to spar and practice with you in person.

As a student of the RSA, it is expected that you are maintaining a healthy lifestyle. It is recommended that you are drinking plenty of water before, during, and after any training, practice, sparring, dueling, or meditation. As fencing is deeply cerebral, be sure to get plenty of sleep (between six and eight hours) and sufficient daily exercise. If you find yourself too anxious or stressed to learn effectively, engaging in daily relaxation meditation may help.

The RSA provides, on its website, an online platform for finding other students interested in sparring and dueling near you. Even if you are surrounded by fellow students in your club or dojo, take a moment to create an account with the RSA. In that way, less fortunate students can find you, and you will be able to help them in this critical element in their quest to master the combat saber.

Mastery Code: YL9WEV9

View the corresponding video for this lesson!

Further Study: In this “Further Study” section, found near the end of many text-only and video lessons, you will be given terms to look up and study online that correspond with the source material that inspired the particular lesson or technique. You can even bring these terms to your instructor, depending on their area of expertise, for more clarification on one maneuver or another. If you are a master or teacher yourself, this part of a lesson can give you greater insight into how the technique should be taught or performed.

The above lesson has been a free sample from the RSA’s Book: MASTER THE COMBAT SABER. Own your own copy today!




The Way of Wisdom

Select a Form 1 Saber Training Lesson





Master the Combat Saber
Form 1
A map of Japan and the far east

The Two-Handed Form

Form 1 (The Two-Handed Form), also known as the “Way of Wisdom” is a great set of saber dueling techniques for beginners and resembles most closely the choreography seen in the Star Wars universe. It is primarily based upon far eastern martial arts and sword fighting styles, most notably those found in Kendo, Iaido, Kenjutsu, and in the meditative Chinese Tai Chi Sword. Form 1 provides a well-rounded attack and defense against other RSA forms as well as those mastered outside of the RSA. In its techniques, stable footing, level-headedness, and proper execution are all prioritized. All you need is a full sized saber with a hilt that can be held with both hands in order to learn the techniques of this form, which are organized into three modules, “Basic,” “Intermediate,” and “Advanced.” Each module contains about 20 five-minute lessons.




The Way of Power

Select a Form 2 Saber Training Lesson




Form 2
A map of the world

The One-Handed Form

Form 2 (The One-Handed Form), also known as the “Way of Power” is a devastating and aggressive set of saber dueling techniques for those who wish to give themselves a competitive edge. It is primarily based upon the modern sword fighting styles of Olympic fencing foil, epee and sabre. Form 2 provides duelists with deceptively simple ways to get around even the most careful of defensive strategies. In its techniques, light-footwork, trickery, and lightning-fast maneuvers are all prioritized. All you need is a full sized, (or shortened) saber (preferably light in weight) with a hilt that can be held with just one hand in order to best learn the techniques of this form, which are organized into three modules, “Basic,” “Intermediate,” and “Advanced.” Each module contains about 20 five-minute lessons.




The Way of Strength

Select a Form 3 Saber Training Lesson




Form 1
A map of Europe

The Cross-Guard Form

Form 3 (The Cross-Guard Form), also known as the “Way of Strength” is a historic set of saber dueling techniques that capitalize on sabers that have a cross-guard in their hilt. It is primarily based upon medieval European sword fighting styles, most notably those found in HEMA (Historic European Martial Arts) longsword sparring. Form 3 grants duelists a hearty, defense-heavy advantage in dueling and a way to withstand even the most unexpected of attacks. In its techniques, automatic responses, physically powerful blows, and versatility are all prioritized. All you need is a full sized saber with a hilt with cross-guards in order to learn the techniques of this form, which are organized into three modules, “Basic,” “Intermediate,” and “Advanced.” Each module contains about 20 five-minute lessons.




The Way of Balance

Altnerate Form 1
A map of Japan

The Staff Form

Alternate Form 1 (The Staff Form), also known as the “Way of Balance” is a bonus set of saber dueling techniques that can be utilized with a “Saber-Staff” or “Double-Bladed Saber”. It is an extension of the RSA’s Form 1 training with additional techniques based on a number of Japanese and Korean martial arts that include “Bo” training including Bōjutsu. Alternate Form 1 grants duelists a stylistic challenge, good mental training and a test of skill at any level of mastery. In its techniques, careful planning, unpredictability, and the unique advantages that come from the weapon are all prioritized. A long saber hilt with two shortened blades on each end is required to learn the techniques of this form, which are only taught within the RSA’s handbook, soon to be available in our online store!




The Way of Cunning

Altnerate Form 1
A map of the world

The Twin Sabers Form

Alternate Form 2 (The Twin Sabers Form), also known as the “Way of Cunning” is a bonus set of saber dueling techniques that can be utilized with two shortened sabers, one in each hand. It is an extension of the RSA’s Form 2 training with additional techniques based on South American Machete techniques, Filipino Knife fighting methods, and more. Alternate Form 2 allows for tremendous rang and versatility for both attacks and defensive maneuvers. In its techniques, practice-enforced muscle memory and the utilization of an opponent’s weaknesses are prioritized. Two sabers equipped with short blades are required to learn the techniques of this form, which are only taught within the RSA’s handbook, soon to be available in our online store!




Enter in a Mastery Code

After you have mastered a technique from a training video, live class, or from personal study, move forward in your path to knighthood and win points by entering in the corresponding lesson’s “Mastery Code” into the field below! (These codes can be found at the end of each lesson in our handbook or eBook.)


Please Log-in or Create a New Account in order to track your lesson mastery!





Keep Track Of Your Progress!

My Saber Lessons Checklist


Please log in or create a new account in order to track your lesson progress.

Use the chart above in order to see which lessons you have mastered, and which ones you still need to check out. Clear crystals represent lessons you have yet to take, and colored glowing crystals show which lessons you’ve mastered. Hover your mouse over each crystal to see the name of the lesson it represents, and click on the crystal to go to the corresponding lesson!



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Copyright © 2018 Great Dad Media. All Rights Reserved. This site and its pages (first made available on March 4, 2017) are all privately owned and operated by Great Dad Media on behalf of combat saber enthusiasts, fencing clubs, swordplay dojos and alternative sport fans around the world. All images used here are either originally produced, used with permission, or are publically available on open source sites. Unless otherwise stated, materials herein are not available to the public to be printed, used or copied. If there are any errors or outdated facts on this site, or if you have suggestions on how this material can be improved, please contact us here. Although our students are also predominately fans of the Star Wars franchise, and the term “lightsaber” is used herein to refer to the “combat saber” (see the disambiguation here), this is not an official site of Lucasfilm Ltd., the Disney Corporation, or any of their affiliates. The Rogue Saber Academy is not endorsed by or affiliated with these organizations.


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